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Government

  • County board plans for year ahead

    INDEPENDENCE — At the Grayson County Board of Supervisors’ Jan. 10 meeting, County Administrator Bill Shepley used his monthly administrator’s report time to provide an overview for the upcoming budget session.
    In his summary, Shepley explained that upcoming financial challenges will require the county to review certain areas of the budget when considering future budget seasons.

  • Bill proposes $15/hr minimum wage

    Capital News Service

    RICHMOND — After dozens of women rallied at the Capitol on the opening day of the 2019 General Assembly session, a legislative committee passed one of their key priorities — a bill to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour in Virginia.
    SB 1200 would take effect July 1, initially raising the minimum wage to $10 an hour, then to $13 an hour in 2020 and $15 an hour in 2021. The bill, which passed the Senate Commerce and Labor Committee on a 6-4 vote, has advanced to the full Senate for a vote.

  • Virginians split on arming teachers

    Capital News Service

    RICHMOND — Virginians are divided on whether they would support legislation to train schoolteachers and administrators to be armed on school grounds, according to a poll conducted at Virginia Commonwealth University.
    “It was almost split right down the middle,” said Robyn McDougle, director for the Center for Public Policy in VCU’s L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs, which conducted the study.

  • Shutdown affects SNAP benefits

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is working to provide relief for recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program due to limited funding as a result of the federal government shutdown.
    According to a news release issued from the USDA on Tuesday, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue has announced a plan to ensure that low-income Americans can have access to the nutrition while congress and the president are at a budget impasse.

  • Legislators prepare for General Assembly

    RICHMOND — The Virginia General Assembly’s 2019 session will convene beginning Jan. 9 and two legislators representing the Twin Counties are already busy pre-filing pieces of legislation.
    Sen. William M. Stanley Jr. (R-20th District) already has a number of bills pre-filed for this year, some of which were introduced as far back a July 2018. His district includes Galax and part of Carroll County.
    Del. Israel O’Quinn (R-5th District) has pre-filed one bill so far for this year’s session. His district includes Grayson County and Galax.

  • County adds Q&A to public comments

    INDEPENDENCE — The Grayson County Board of Supervisors, at their Jan. 3 organization meeting, approved the option of adding a question and answer period for clarification purposes. The board’s goal with this change is to improve communication with the public during their monthly meetings.

  • Governor shares plan for suspended drivers in debt

    RICHMOND — Gov. Ralph Northam recently announced plans to end the suspension of driver’s licenses for citizens in Virginia who have outstanding criminal or traffic court debt.
    According to a recent article in The Virginian-Pilot Newspaper, Northam said the reason for outstanding court costs is primarily due to the fact that motorists cannot afford to pay their fines. He noted that suspending motorists’ drivers licenses for unpaid fees only makes the process more difficult for them.

  • County board hears updates on initiatives

    INDEPENDENCE — The Grayson County Board of Supervisors discussed a number of ongoing projects and efforts to improve the county and draw in visitors during their Nov. 8 meeting.
    County Administrator Bill Shepley highlighted several projects, many of which tie in to the list of initiatives that were announced by himself and the board at the beginning of this year, during his monthly report to the board.

    Broadband project

  • Griffith, Kaine retain seats in 2018 election

    While Virginia continues its transformation into a progressive “blue state” with a series of recent Democratic victories in statewide races, the majority of local voters staunchly held on to conservative “red state” values Nov. 6..
    Democrats took back control of the U.S. House of Representatives in the Nov. 6 election, but most voters in the Twin Counties still favored Republican candidates.

  • Amendments will be on Nov. 6 ballots

    While many voters are aware of who’s on the ballot in November, some are surprised to find out they’re not just voting for politicians, but also possibly new laws.
    In Virginia, voters will see two proposed state constitutional amendments regarding taxation of property, which they can vote “yes” or “no” on.

    Amendment 1